Building a Development Environment Part 4: make CruiseControl.NET execute and report your NUnit tests

This is part 4 in my series on managing the build process.

After seting up a source code repository in Part 1 , setup CruiseControl.NET to monitor it in Part 2 and actually produce some sourcecode in Part 3 we now will test this code to see if it works correctly.

That is what we will do in this part of the series: Create a simple library written in C# and build it automaticaly.

But first:

Disclaimer

This post is by no means “The Way” of building a development environment. In fact, you will notice that at times I deviate from some of the practices advocated by the referred articles at the end of my articles. It’s our interpretation of the process and how we implement it. If you have any remarks or suggestions for improvement, please post a comment.
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Building a Development Environment Part 3: Managing the buildprocess Nant and Visual Studio

This is part 3 in my series on managing the build process.

What have we got till now? Well, we’ve setup a source code repository in Part 1 and setup CruiseControl.NET to monitor it in Part 2. But we wouldn’t need all this if we didn’t want to develop some software and thus have some source code we want to maintain and build.

That is what we will do in this part of the series: Create a simple library written in C# and build it automaticaly.

But first:

Disclaimer

This post is by no means “The Way” of building a development environment. In fact, you will notice that at times I deviate from some of the practices advocated by the referred articles at the end of my articles. It’s our interpretation of the process and how we implement it. If you have any remarks or suggestions for improvement, please post a comment.
Continue reading

Building a Development Environment Part 2: Setup CruiseControl.NET for continuous integration

In this second installment in a series of posts about building a development environment I will discuss the setup of a continuous integration server.

I will not try convince you of using continuous integration in your process, or discuss the possible benifits of using it. A lot has allready been written about this. If you have decided to use continouos integration and are looking for experiences and practical advice on implementing the process, then this post can be of some help.

Disclaimer

This post is by no means “The Way” of building a development environment. In fact, you will notice that at times I deviate from some of the practices advocated by the referred articles at the end of my articles. It’s our interpretation of the process and how we implement it. If you have any remarks or suggestions for improvement, please post a comment.
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Building a Development Environment Part 1: Managing your sourcecode with Subversion

This first installment in a series of posts about building a development environment is about repository lay-out and getting the code out of your source control system.

I originaly was planning on writing a series of articles about how we implemented continuous integration (CI). However, while experimenting and searching the internet for information, I quickly came to the conclusion that this whole CI thing was just to narrow in scope. There is a lot of information and a lot of blogs discussing CI, but most of them are people starting to write a simple application and them being the only one working on it. So, no projects made of multiple subprojects, no projects shared by other projects, no developer interaction, etc…

But in a real company you do have several developers, you do enable reuse and thus use a project in multiple other projects, you do have organisational standards (how projects must be setup, where code must be commited in the source code repository, etc…) that must be applied, etc… Some of this interacts with CI and this is way I made the scope of the series bigger:

How Do I Build An Environment To Develop Software?

Disclaimer

This post is by no means “The Way” of building a development environment. In fact, you will notice that at times I deviate from some of the practices advocated by the referred articles at the end of my articles. It’s our interpretation of the process and how we implement it. If you have any remarks or suggestions for improvement, please post a comment.
Continue reading